Merge branch 'master' of ssh://code.leap.se/leap_doc
[leap_doc.git] / docs / platform / development.md
1 @title = "Development Environment"
2 @toc = true
3
4 If you are wanting to make local changes to your provider, or want to contribute some fixes back to LEAP, we recommend that you follow this guide to build up a development environment to test your changes first. Using this method, you can quickly test your changes without deploying them to your production environment, while benefitting from the convenience of reverting to known good states in order to retry things from scratch. 
5
6 This page will walk you through setting up nodes using [Vagrant](http://www.vagrantup.com/) for convenient deployment testing, snapshotting known good states, and reverting to previous snapshots. 
7
8 Requirements
9 ============
10
11 * Be a real machine with virtualization support in the CPU (VT-x or AMD-V). In other words, not a virtual machine.
12 * Have at least 4gb of RAM.
13 * Have a fast internet connection (because you will be downloading a lot of big files, like virtual machine images).
14 * You should do everything described below as an unprivileged user, and only run those commands as root that are noted with *sudo* in front of them. Other than those commands, there is no need for privileged access to your machine, and in fact things may not work correctly.
15
16 Install prerequisites
17 --------------------------------
18
19 For development purposes, you will need everything that you need for deploying the LEAP platform:
20
21 * LEAP cli
22 * A provider instance
23
24 You will also need to setup a virtualized Vagrant environment, to do so please make sure you have the following
25 pre-requisites installed:
26
27 *Debian & Ubuntu*
28
29 Install core prerequisites:
30
31     sudo apt-get install git ruby ruby-dev rsync openssh-client openssl rake make
32
33 Install Vagrant in order to be able to test with local virtual machines (typically optional, but required for this tutorial). You probably want a more recent version directly from [vagrant.](https://www.vagrantup.com/downloads.htm)
34
35     sudo apt-get install vagrant virtualbox
36
37
38 *Mac OS X 10.9 (Mavericks)*
39
40 Install Homebrew package manager from http://brew.sh/ and enable the [System Duplicates Repository](https://github.com/Homebrew/homebrew/wiki/Interesting-Taps-&-Branches) (needed to update old software versions delivered by Apple) with
41
42     brew tap homebrew/dupes
43
44 Update OpenSSH to support ECDSA keys. Follow [this guide](http://www.dctrwatson.com/2013/07/how-to-update-openssh-on-mac-os-x/) to let your system use the Homebrew binary.
45
46     brew install openssh --with-brewed-openssl --with-keychain-support
47
48 The certtool provided by Apple it's really old, install the one provided by GnuTLS and shadow the system's default.
49
50     sudo brew install gnutls
51     ln -sf /usr/local/bin/gnutls-certtool /usr/local/bin/certool
52
53 Install the Vagrant and VirtualBox packages for OS X from their respective Download pages.
54
55 * http://www.vagrantup.com/downloads.html
56 * https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads
57
58
59 2. Install 
60
61
62 Adding development nodes to your provider
63 =========================================
64
65 Now you will add local-only Vagrant development nodes to your provider. 
66
67 You do not need to setup a different provider instance for development, in fact it is more convenient if you do not, but you can if you wish.  If you do not have a provider already, you will need to create one and configure it before continuing (it is recommended you go through the [Quick Start](quick-start) before continuing down this path). 
68
69
70 Create local development nodes
71 ------------------------------
72
73 We will add "local" nodes, which are special nodes that are used only for testing. These nodes exist only as virtual machines on your computer, and cannot be accessed from the outside. Each "node" is a server that can have one or more services attached to it. We recommend that you create different nodes for different services to better isolate issues.
74
75 While in your provider directory, create a local node, with the service "webapp":
76
77     $ leap node add --local web1 services:webapp
78      = created nodes/web1.json
79      = created files/nodes/web1/
80      = created files/nodes/web1/web1.key
81      = created files/nodes/web1/web1.crt
82
83 This command creates a node configuration file in `nodes/web1.json` with the webapp service. 
84
85 Starting local development nodes
86 --------------------------------
87
88 In order to test the node "web1" we need to start it. Starting a node for the first time will spin up a virtual machine. The first time you do this will take some time because it will need to download a VM image (about 700mb). After you've downloaded the base image, you will not need to download it again, and instead you will re-use the downloaded image (until you need to update the image).
89
90 NOTE: Many people have difficulties getting Vagrant working. If the following commands do not work, please see the Vagrant section below to troubleshoot your Vagrant install before proceeding.
91
92     $ leap local start web1
93      = created test/
94      = created test/Vagrantfile
95      = installing vagrant plugin 'sahara'
96     Bringing machine 'web1' up with 'virtualbox' provider...
97     [web1] Box 'leap-wheezy' was not found. Fetching box from specified URL for
98     the provider 'virtualbox'. Note that if the URL does not have
99     a box for this provider, you should interrupt Vagrant now and add
100     the box yourself. Otherwise Vagrant will attempt to download the
101     full box prior to discovering this error.
102     Downloading or copying the box...
103     Progress: 3% (Rate: 560k/s, Estimated time remaining: 0:13:36)
104     ...
105     Bringing machine 'web1' up with 'virtualbox' provider...
106     [web1] Importing base box 'leap-wheezy'...
107     0%...10%...20%...30%...40%...50%...60%...70%...80%...90%...100%
108
109 Now the virtual machine 'web1' is running. You can add another local node using the same process. For example, the webapp node needs a databasse to run, so let's add a "couchdb" node:
110
111     $ leap node add --local db1 services:couchdb
112     $ leap local start
113      = updated test/Vagrantfile
114     Bringing machine 'db1' up with 'virtualbox' provider...
115     [db1] Importing base box 'leap-wheezy'...
116     [db1] Matching MAC address for NAT networking...
117     [db1] Setting the name of the VM...
118     [db1] Clearing any previously set forwarded ports...
119     [db1] Fixed port collision for 22 => 2222. Now on port 2202.
120     [db1] Creating shared folders metadata...
121     [db1] Clearing any previously set network interfaces...
122     [db1] Preparing network interfaces based on configuration...
123     [db1] Forwarding ports...
124     [db1] -- 22 => 2202 (adapter 1)
125     [db1] Running any VM customizations...
126     [db1] Booting VM...
127     [db1] Waiting for VM to boot. This can take a few minutes.
128     [db1] VM booted and ready for use!
129     [db1] Configuring and enabling network interfaces...
130     [db1] Mounting shared folders...
131     [db1] -- /vagrant
132
133 You now can follow the normal LEAP process and initialize it and then deploy your recipes to it:
134
135     $ leap node init web1
136     $ leap deploy web1
137     $ leap node init db1
138     $ leap deploy db1
139
140
141 Useful local development commands
142 =================================
143
144 There are many useful things you can do with a virtualized development environment. 
145
146 Listing what machines are running
147 ---------------------------------
148
149 Now you have the two virtual machines "web1" and "db1" running, you can see the running machines as follows:
150
151     $ leap local status
152     Current machine states:
153
154     db1                      running (virtualbox)
155     web1                     running (virtualbox)
156
157     This environment represents multiple VMs. The VMs are all listed
158     above with their current state. For more information about a specific
159     VM, run `vagrant status NAME`.
160
161 Stopping machines
162 -----------------
163
164 It is not recommended that you leave your virtual machines running when you are not using them. They consume memory and other resources! To stop your machines, simply do the following:
165
166     $ leap local stop web1 db1
167
168 Connecting to machines
169 ----------------------
170
171 You can connect to your local nodes just like you do with normal LEAP nodes, by running 'leap ssh node'. 
172
173 However, if you cannot connect to your local node, because the networking is not setup properly, or you have deployed a firewall that locks you out, you may need to access the graphical console.
174
175 In order to do that, you will need to configure Vagrant to launch a graphical console and then you can login as root there to diagnose the networking problem. To do this, add the following to your $HOME/.leaprc:
176
177     @custom_vagrant_vm_line = 'config.vm.provider "virtualbox" do |v|
178       v.gui = true
179     end'
180
181 and then start, or restart, your local Vagrant node. You should get a VirtualBox graphical interface presented to you showing you the bootup and eventually the login.
182
183 Snapshotting machines
184 ---------------------
185
186 A very useful feature of local Vagrant development nodes is the ability to snapshot the current state and then revert to that when you need. 
187
188 For example, perhaps the base image is a little bit out of date and you want to get the packages updated to the latest before continuing. You can do that simply by starting the node, connecting to it and updating the packages and then snapshotting the node:
189
190     $ leap local start web1
191     $ leap ssh web1
192     web1# apt-get -u dist-upgrade
193     web1# exit
194     $ leap local save web1
195
196 Now you can deploy to web1 and if you decide you want to revert to the state before deployment, you simply have to reset the node to your previous save:
197
198     $ leap local reset web1
199
200 More information
201 ----------------
202
203 See `leap help local` for a complete list of local-only commands and how they can be used.
204
205
206 Limitations
207 ===========
208
209 Please consult the known issues for vagrant, see the [Known Issues](known-issues), section *Special Environments*
210
211
212 Troubleshooting Vagrant
213 =======================
214
215 To troubleshoot vagrant issues, try going through these steps:
216
217 * Try plain vagrant using the [Getting started guide](http://docs.vagrantup.com/v2/getting-started/index.html).
218 * If that fails, make sure that you can run virtual machines (VMs) in plain virtualbox (Virtualbox GUI or VBoxHeadless). 
219   We don't suggest a sepecial howto for that, [this one](http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2012/02/virtualbox-install-create-vm/) seems pretty decent, or you follow the [Oracale Virtualbox User Manual](http://www.virtualbox.org/manual/UserManual.html). There's also specific documentation for [Debian](https://wiki.debian.org/VirtualBox) and for [Ubuntu](https://help.ubuntu.com/community/VirtualBox). If you succeeded, try again if you now can start vagrant nodes using plain vagrant (see first step).
220 * If plain vagrant works for you, you're very close to using vagrant with leap ! If you encounter any problems now, please [contact us](https://leap.se/en/about-us/contact) or use our [issue tracker](https://leap.se/code)
221
222 Known working combinations
223 --------------------------
224
225 Please consider that using other combinations might work for you as well, these are just the combinations we tried and worked for us:
226
227
228 Debian Wheezy
229 -------------
230
231 * `virtualbox-4.2 4.2.16-86992~Debian~wheezy` from Oracle and `vagrant 1.2.2` from vagrantup.com
232
233
234 Ubuntu Raring 13.04
235 -------------------
236
237 * `virtualbox 4.2.10-dfsg-0ubuntu2.1` from Ubuntu raring and `vagrant 1.2.2` from vagrantup.com
238
239 Mac OS X 10.9
240 -------------
241
242 * `VirtualBox 4.3.10` from virtualbox.org and `vagrant 1.5.4` from vagrantup.com
243
244
245 Using Vagrant with libvirt/kvm
246 ==============================
247
248 Vagrant can be used with different providers/backends, one of them is [vagrant-libvirt](https://github.com/pradels/vagrant-libvirt). Here are the steps how to use it. Be sure to use a recent vagrant version (>= 1.3).
249
250 Install vagrant-libvirt plugin and add box
251 ------------------------------------------
252     sudo apt-get install libvirt-bin libvirt-dev
253     vagrant plugin install vagrant-libvirt
254     vagrant plugin install sahara
255     vagrant box add leap-wheezy https://downloads.leap.se/leap-debian-libvirt.box
256
257 Remove Virtualbox
258 -----------------
259     sudo apt-get remove virtualbox*
260
261 Debugging
262 ---------
263
264 If you get an error in any of the above commands, try to get some debugging information, it will often tell you what is wrong. In order to get debugging logs, you simply need to re-run the command that produced the error but prepend the command with VAGRANT_LOG=info, for example:
265     VAGRANT_LOG=info vagrant box add leap-wheezy https://downloads.leap.se/leap-debian-libvirt.box
266
267 Start it
268 --------
269
270 Use this example Vagrantfile:
271
272     Vagrant.configure("2") do |config|
273       config.vm.define :testvm do |testvm|
274         testvm.vm.box = "leap-wheezy"
275         testvm.vm.network :private_network, :ip => '10.6.6.201'
276       end
277
278       config.vm.provider :libvirt do |libvirt|
279         libvirt.connect_via_ssh = false
280       end
281     end
282
283 Then:
284
285     vagrant up --provider=libvirt
286
287 If everything works, you should export libvirt as the VAGRANT_DEFAULT_PROVIDER:
288
289     export VAGRANT_DEFAULT_PROVIDER="libvirt" 
290
291 Now you should be able to use the `leap local` commands.
292
293 Known Issues
294 ------------
295
296 * 'Call to virConnectOpen failed: internal error: Unable to locate libvirtd daemon in /usr/sbin (to override, set $LIBVIRTD_PATH to the name of the libvirtd binary)' - you don't have the libvirtd daemon running or installed, be sure you installed the 'libvirt-bin' package and it is running
297 * 'Call to virConnectOpen failed: Failed to connect socket to '/var/run/libvirt/libvirt-sock': Permission denied' - you need to be in the libvirt group to access the socket, do 'sudo adduser <user> libvirt' and then re-login to your session
298 * if each call to vagrant ends up with a segfault, it may be because you still have virtualbox around. if so, remove virtualbox to keep only libvirt + KVM. according to https://github.com/pradels/vagrant-libvirt/issues/75 having two virtualization engines installed simultaneously can lead to such weird issues.
299 * see the [vagrant-libvirt issue list on github](https://github.com/pradels/vagrant-libvirt/issues)
300 * be sure to use vagrant-libvirt >= 0.0.11 and sahara >= 0.0.16 (which are the latest stable gems you would get with `vagrant plugin install [vagrant-libvirt|sahara]`) for proper libvirt support
301 * for shared folder support, you need nfs-kernel-server installed on the host machine and set up sudo to allow unpriviledged users to modify /etc/exports and .....